3 Crucial Wedding Photography No-No’s

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You’ve no doubt been reading articles and speaking with people (including your photographer) about all of the things you need to or should do on the day of your wedding. But there are also some key things not to do

1: Don’t rush though the important things. This includes your posed photos of course, but it also includes dinner. Weddings rarely run exactly as scheduled and you may find that you’re a bit behind. If you’re concerned about your photography going past the time you originally booked for, don’t try to speed through your posed photos or your dinner. (Keep in mind that your guests have all been waiting patiently to eat for several hours.)

Yes, you will have to pay your photographer for the additional time, but it most likely will only be another 30 to 60 minutes. If you’re stressing about it, ask yourself what’s worth more… Rushing your photos and rushing your guests through dinner? Or paying a little extra to ensure that your photos are perfect and that everyone attending your wedding gets to enjoy being there and to enjoy the meal you provided?

2: Stylists, Event and/or Wedding Coordinators should not be present during your posed photos. It’s essential to ensure that your photographer is able do their job as well as they can, without being impeded. For some perspective on this, imagine you’re at work and someone is looking over your shoulder the entire time, although it’s vital to your task that you be unsupervised. To make matters worse, they’re interrupting you, slowing you down, and offering their opinion of how you should do your job, even though they have very little idea of what it is that you do. Could you work like that – let alone do your best?

Onlookers who are not in the photos, are a serious impediment to your photographer being able work properly and as quickly as possible. For the people getting their pictures taken, having an audience makes it impossible to feel comfortable and not self-conscious. All of which will poorly affect the quality of your photos. Also, stylists and coordinators will often feel it’s their business to offer suggestions and advice to your photographer or to you, which is actually the opposite of helpful.

3: Don’t disagree or be ungracious when your photographer tells you it’s time for a quick break. Assuming your photographer is a professional, they will know when it’s appropriate to take a few minutes, for their sake and for yours. You should expect and encourage them to take ten minutes every two hours or so.

Remember, they’re carrying a heavy bag of equipment and a heavy camera in their hands constantly, while having to be energetic and friendly with every single person at your wedding, all day long. Unlike almost any other job, your photographer doesn’t get to take a half hour for lunch or a few moments to themselves, or even visit the washroom whenever they need to. They’re working intensely and pretty much non-stop from the moment they arrive until the moment they leave.

In order to do their job properly and well, your photographer really needs to rest and recharge every once in a while. Pushing them to the point of exhaustion is not going to result in good photos or good feelings for anybody. When they tell you a break is needed, it’s because it’s necessary. Be gracious and don’t argue about it.

One final thing to think about: After your wedding is over, your photographer still has literally weeks of work to do, editing and retouching your pictures. They have to look at and work on hundreds – often thousands – of images of your face, over and over again. If your photographer had a difficult or unpleasant experience at your wedding or with you, it could negatively affect the amount of effort, time and care they’ll put into working on your photos.

Paying attention to these important ‘Don’ts’ on your wedding day, makes all the difference to the quality of your wedding photos, not just on the day of, but afterwards as well.

Tamea Burd is a Vancouver photographer who specializes in portraits, headshots, corporate and wedding photography.

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